Tag Archives: social and environmental accounting

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Call for contributions: 15th International Conference on CSR and 6th Org. Gov. Conference

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Deadline extended: Call for chapters Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Governance in Ibero-America: Concepts, perspectives, and future trends

CALL FOR CHAPTERS

Chapter proposals due: November 30, 2015

Full chapters due: June 15, 2016

Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Governance in Ibero-America: Concepts, perspectives, and future trends

Edited by:

Lina M. Gómez, Universidad del Este, Puerto Rico

Lucely Vargas-Preciado, Johannes Kepler Universitat, Austria

David Crowther, De Montfort University, UK

Publisher:

Emerald Publishing Group

Book series in Developments in Corporate Governance and Responsibility

 RATIONALE

The practice of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been growing in attention, importance, significance, and acceptance in the last decades, not only in the corporate world but academia as well.  CSR has been included in multiple debates, comments, theories, studies and research around the world. In spite of this CSR awareness among different sectors, still there is not a shared definition of what CSR should be and include (Ihlen et al., 2011; Crowther & Aras, 2008; Dahlsrud, 2008; Garriga & Melé, 2004). In fact, CSR could mean different things to different people in different scenarios, eras, and regions (Pedersen, 2006). However, CSR is strongly view as a responsible management of economic, social, and environmental resources, that could affect (positively and negatively) the quality of life of different groups of stakeholders, and could also increase or decrease the creation of value for shareholders.  Moreover, thanks to social media and new communication technologies, society, consumers, employees, ONGs, and higher educational institutions are claiming more transparency and responsibility towards corporations.  Today there is more awareness regarding the importance of CSR practices that can benefit society and environment (Du et al., 2010; Schneider, Stieglitz & Lattemann, 2007).

In the last decade, Ibero-America (including Brazil, Portugal, and Spain), has growth in economic terms, and corporate responsible practices have play a key role. A CSR approach in community-based experience has emerged in the last years in this region. This is due to the support of multilateral agencies (Gutiérrez & Jones, 2004) that have served as a link between government, private sector and society (Calderón, 2011).  However, there are still many inequalities in this region. Therefore, this edited book will focus on how CSR and Corporate Governance in Ibero-America have been employed, analyzed, and examined in different sectors and scenarios (companies, NGOs, higher educational institutions, government) from theoretical (theory development), conceptual, methodological, and empirical approaches. Submissions that are from an empirical approach must be cross-country studies or studies that analyze multiple projects from different sectors within a country. This is because most research in CSR in Latin America has been focused on studying specific initiatives or experiences in a particular country.

Some questions that can guide contributions and could serve as reflection for contributors on possible topics could include:

-How CSR in Ibero-America can be moved forward?

-What present and future trends in CSR and Corporate Governance are presented in Ibero-America?

-How the complex relationship between business and society in Ibero-America can help to advance the practice of CSR?

-How CSR in Ibero-America can be structured to promote compliance and therefore CSR efforts could be translate in actual results?

-Which are the views and input of different groups of stakeholders regarding CSR efforts in Ibero-America?

-What and how CSR is communicated in Ibero-America?

-What are the practical challenges of CSR practices and efforts in Ibero-America? How these can serve as opportunities for promoting creative and engaging responsible practices?

We accept contributions from academics, researchers, and practitioners from a variety of academic disciplines, such as (but not limited to): business management, finance, communication, economics, political science, psychology, cultural studies, health, law, and sociology.

The editors welcome chapters from theoretical, conceptual, and empirical approaches. Empirical studies should be based on quantitative and/or qualitative methods, including case of studies and best practices, particularly of cross-country studies.  Literature review papers are also welcome. Contributions must be in English.  We seek papers that address different aspects of CSR, Sustainability, Governance and Performance, among others; which could cover the following topics focused on Ibero-America (but not limited to):

  1. Corporate Social Responsibility (internal and external practices)
  2. Corporate Governance, policy private, and public sector
  3. Environmental issues
  4. Societal issues
  5. Corporate reporting
  6. Corporate engagement and education
  7. Corporate Social Responsibility and Governance:  Non-Financial and Financial Performance
  8. Sustainability
  9. Employee development and labor practices
  10. CSR strategy,  society, customers and suppliers
  11. Business ethics, social accounting  and governance
  12. CSR-Sustainability management
  13. CSR communication

Submission process

Authors are invited to submit, on or before November 30, 2015, a proposal (an abstract of 300-600 words) that clearly explains the purpose of the work proposed, methodology, expected results, and implications.  Proposals should be submitted via e-mail in a PDF attachment to lmgomez@suagm.edu. The first page of the proposal should include the title of the proposed chapter, authors’ names, affiliation, and full contact details.

By December 30, 2015, potential authors will be notified about the status of their proposed chapter and receive further information regarding the submission process, including the formatting guidelines. Full chapters must be submitted via e-mail in a attached Word file to lmgomez@suagm.edu  on or before June 15, 2016. Final submissions should be approximately 6,000–8,000 words in length, excluding references, figures, tables, and appendices. Chapters submitted must not have been published, accepted for publication, or under consideration for publication anywhere else.

Questions

Please address questions to Prof. Lina M. Gómez (lmgomez@suagm.edu) or Prof. Lucely Vargas-Preciado (vargas_lucely@hotmail.com)

REFERENCES

Calderón, M. (2011). CSR in Latin America and South East Asia Analysis of the Corporate Communication of Top Local Companies. International Research Journal of Finance and Economics, 73, 56-74.

Crowther, D. & Aras, G. (2008). Corporate Social Responsibility. Ventus Publishing ApS: Denmark

Dahlsrud, A. (2008). How corporate social responsibility is defined: an analysis of 37 definitions. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 15 (1), 1-13. doi: 10.1002/csr.132

Du, S., Bhattacharya , C.B., & Sen, S. (2010). Maximizing Business Returns to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): The Role of CSR Communication. International Journal of Management Reviews, 12 (1), 8-19. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-2370.2009.00276.x

Garriga, E., & Melé, D. (2004). Corporate Social Responsibility Theories: Mapping the Territory. Journal of Business Ethics, 53 (1/2), 51–71. doi: 10.1023/B:BUSI.0000039399.90587.34

Gutiérrez, R., & Jones, A. (2004).Corporate Social Responsibility in Latin America: An Overview of Its Characteristics and Effects on Local Communities. In M. Contreras (ed.), Corporate Social Responsibility in the Promotion of Social Development EXPERIENCES FROM ASIA AND LATIN AMERICA (pp. 151-188). Washington, DC: Inter-American Development Bank.

Ihlen, O. Barlett, J.L, & May, S. (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility and Communication. In O. Ihlen, J.L. Barlett, & S. May (Eds.), The Handbook of Communication and Corporate Social Responsibility (pp.3-22). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Pedersen, E.R. (2006). Making Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Operable: How Companies translate stakeholder dialogue into practice. Business and Society Review, 111 (2), 137-163. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8594.2006.00265.x

Schneider, A.M., Stieglitz, S., & Lattemann, C. (2007). Social Software as an Instrument of CSR. Proceedings of ICT, Transparency and Social Responsibility, Lisbon, Portugal.

Call for chapters – Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Governance in Ibero-America: Concepts, perspectives, and future trends

CALL FOR CHAPTERS
Chapter proposals due: November 15, 2015
Full chapters due: May 31, 2016

Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Governance in Ibero-America: Concepts, perspectives, and future trends

Edited by:
Lina M. Gómez, Universidad del Este, Puerto Rico
Lucely Vargas-Preciado, Johannes Kepler Universitat, Austria
David Crowther, De Montfort University, UK

Publisher:
Emerald Publishing Group
Book series in Developments in Corporate Governance and Responsibility

RATIONALE

The practice of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been growing in attention, importance, significance, and acceptance in the last decades, not only in the corporate world but academia as well. CSR has been included in multiple debates, comments, theories, studies and research around the world. In spite of this CSR awareness among different sectors, still there is not a shared definition of what CSR should be and include (Ihlen et al., 2011; Crowther & Aras, 2008; Dahlsrud, 2008; Garriga & Melé, 2004). In fact, CSR could mean different things to different people in different scenarios, eras, and regions (Pedersen, 2006). However, CSR is strongly view as a responsible management of economic, social, and environmental resources, that could affect (positively and negatively) the quality of life of different groups of stakeholders, and could also increase or decrease the creation of value for shareholders. Moreover, thanks to social media and new communication technologies, society, consumers, employees, ONGs, and higher educational institutions are claiming more transparency and responsibility towards corporations. Today there is more awareness regarding the importance of CSR practices that can benefit society and environment (Du et al., 2010; Schneider, Stieglitz & Lattemann, 2007).

In the last decade, Ibero-America (including Brazil, Portugal, and Spain), has growth in economic terms, and corporate responsible practices have play a key role. A CSR approach in community-based experience has emerged in the last years in this region. This is due to the support of multilateral agencies (Gutiérrez & Jones, 2004) that have served as a link between government, private sector and society (Calderón, 2011). However, there are still many inequalities in this region. Therefore, this edited book will focus on how CSR and Corporate Governance in Ibero-America have been employed, analyzed, and examined in different sectors and scenarios (companies, NGOs, higher educational institutions, government) from theoretical (theory development), conceptual, methodological, and empirical approaches. Submissions that are from an empirical approach must be cross-country studies or studies that analyze multiple projects from different sectors within a country. This is because most research in CSR in Latin America has been focused on studying specific initiatives or experiences in a particular country.

Some questions that can guide contributions and could serve as reflection for contributors on possible topics could include:

-How CSR in Ibero-America can be moved forward?

-What present and future trends in CSR and Corporate Governance are presented in Ibero-America?

-How the complex relationship between business and society in Ibero-America can help to advance the practice of CSR?

-How CSR in Ibero-America can be structured to promote compliance and therefore CSR efforts could be translate in actual results?

-Which are the views and input of different groups of stakeholders regarding CSR efforts in Ibero-America?

-What and how CSR is communicated in Ibero-America?

-What are the practical challenges of CSR practices and efforts in Ibero-America? How these can serve as opportunities for promoting creative and engaging responsible practices?

We accept contributions from academics, researchers, and practitioners from a variety of academic disciplines, such as (but not limited to): business management, finance, communication, economics, political science, psychology, cultural studies, health, law, and sociology.

The editors welcome chapters from theoretical, conceptual, and empirical approaches. Empirical studies should be based on quantitative and/or qualitative methods, including case of studies and best practices, particularly of cross-country studies. Literature review papers are also welcome. Contributions must be in English. We seek papers that address different aspects of CSR, Sustainability, Governance and Performance, among others; which could cover the following topics focused on Ibero-America (but not limited to):

Corporate Social Responsibility (internal and external practices)
Corporate Governance, policy private, and public sector
Environmental issues
Societal issues
Corporate reporting
Corporate engagement and education
Corporate Social Responsibility and Governance: Non-Financial and Financial Performance
Sustainability
Employee development and labor practices
CSR strategy, society, customers and suppliers
Business ethics, social accounting and governance
CSR-Sustainability management
CSR communication
Submission process

Authors are invited to submit, on or before November 15, 2015, a proposal (an abstract of 300-600 words) that clearly explains the purpose of the work proposed, methodology, expected results, and implications. Proposals should be submitted via e-mail in a PDF attachment to lmgomez@suagm.edu  The first page of the proposal should include the title of the proposed chapter, authors’ names, affiliation, and full contact details.

By December 15, 2015, potential authors will be notified about the status of their proposed chapter and receive further information regarding the submission process, including the formatting guidelines. Full chapters must be submitted via e-mail in a attached Word file to lmgomez@suagm.eduon or before May 31, 2016. Final submissions should be approximately 6,000–8,000 words in length, excluding references, figures, tables, and appendices. Chapters submitted must not have been published, accepted for publication, or under consideration for publication anywhere else.

Questions

Please address questions to Prof. Lina M. Gómez (lmgomez@suagm.edu) or Prof. Lucely Vargas-Preciado (vargas_lucely@hotmail.com)

REFERENCES

Calderón, M. (2011). CSR in Latin America and South East Asia Analysis of the Corporate Communication of Top Local Companies. International Research Journal of Finance and Economics, 73, 56-74.

Crowther, D. & Aras, G. (2008). Corporate Social Responsibility. Ventus Publishing ApS: Denmark

Dahlsrud, A. (2008). How corporate social responsibility is defined: an analysis of 37 definitions. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 15 (1), 1-13. doi: 10.1002/csr.132

Du, S., Bhattacharya , C.B., & Sen, S. (2010). Maximizing Business Returns to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): The Role of CSR Communication. International Journal of Management Reviews, 12 (1), 8-19. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-2370.2009.00276.x

Garriga, E., & Melé, D. (2004). Corporate Social Responsibility Theories: Mapping the Territory. Journal of Business Ethics, 53 (1/2), 51–71. doi: 10.1023/B:BUSI.0000039399.90587.34

Gutiérrez, R., & Jones, A. (2004).Corporate Social Responsibility in Latin America: An Overview of Its Characteristics and Effects on Local Communities. In M. Contreras (ed.), Corporate Social Responsibility in the Promotion of Social Development EXPERIENCES FROM ASIA AND LATIN AMERICA (pp. 151-188). Washington, DC: Inter-American Development Bank.

Ihlen, O. Barlett, J.L, & May, S. (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility and Communication. In O. Ihlen, J.L. Barlett, & S. May (Eds.), The Handbook of Communication and Corporate Social Responsibility (pp.3-22). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Pedersen, E.R. (2006). Making Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Operable: How Companies translate stakeholder dialogue into practice. Business and Society Review, 111 (2), 137-163. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8594.2006.00265.x

Schneider, A.M., Stieglitz, S., & Lattemann, C. (2007). Social Software as an Instrument of CSR. Proceedings of ICT, Transparency and Social Responsibility, Lisbon, Portugal.

Call for papers Issues in Social and Environmental Accounting

Call for papers

Issues in Social and Environmental Accounting

(Issues in SEA)

ISSN: 1978-0591

Editor in-Chief:
Associate Prof. Hasan Fauzi, Ph.D., Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia

 About the Journal

Issues In Social and Environmental Accounting (Issues in SEA or ISEA) is an international and refereed journal published quarterly (starting 2013) by Indonesian Center for Social and Environmental Accounting Research and Development (ICSEARD), Sebelas Maret University and The International Institute for Science, Technology and Education (IISTE) (starting 2012) , ISEA is networking and dissemination means of practices and theory of social and environmental accounting by people concerned with that field. In the journal, prospective authors can view the company’s social and environmental performance from management or financial accounting perspective. The parties involved in this journal are scholars from so many countries, including: Indonesia, USA, Canada, UK, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, Ireland, Korea, Jordan, Mexico, Hong Kong, China, Austria, Malaysia, Japan, and India.

Issues in SEA is a peer-reviewed or refereed journal. All articles submitted by potential contributors from all over the world to the editor-in-Chief center (Indonesian Centre for Social and Environmental Accounting Research and Development (ICSEARD)) are administered by editors. They are then evaluated using the blind review method. From the result of peer-reviewing process the articles could be categorized as accepted for publication, accepted with minor revision, accepted with major revision, or rejected for publication.

Subject Coverage

Topics include but are not limited to:

• Environmental accounting
• Social accounting
• Ethical issues in accounting and financial reporting
• Corporate governance and accountability
• Accounting for the Costs and Benefits of CSR-related Activities
• Accounting and Disclosure of Environmental Liabilities
• Corporate Environmental Strategy
• Corporate Social Performance
• Corporate social responsibility and management control
• Corporate social responsiveness
• Triple bottom line performance
• Accounting for Climate Change
• CSR and environmental activity
• CSR and business ethics
• CSR and a low carbon economy
• CSR and sustainability
• Corporate governance and sustainability
• Carbon footprint accounting

Issues in Social and Environmental Accounting is Indexed by:

  • Ebsco
  • Cabell’s Directory of Publishing Opportunities
  • Google Scholar
  • Copernicus

ISEA is currently under the review of Scopus and ISI (Thomson Reuter) index

Issues In Social and Environmental Accounting (ISEA) Journal is published quarterly March, June, September, and December. See notes for author to submit your paper. The potential contributors are required to submit their paper electronically, using Microsoft word, to this addresses:hfauzi@icseard.uns.ac.id,  icseard.uns@gmail.com  and hfz1069@gmail.com

Contact: +62271827003 fax +62271827003
Web Address:
http://isea.icseard.uns.ac.id
http://iiste.org/Journals/index.php/ISEA/index
http://cabells.com/search.aspx
http://www.ebscohost.com/title-lists
http://journals.indexcopernicus.com/masterlist.php?name=Master&litera=I&start=1050&skok=30

Mailing Address:
Indonesian Centre for Social and Environmental Accounting Research and Development (ICSEARD)

Accounting Department-Faculty of Economics
Sebelas Maret University
Jl.Ir Sutami 36 A
Solo Indonesia 57126

Members of Editorial Board

Associate Editors:
Associate Prof. Mostaq M. Hussain, Ph.D.University of New Burswick, Canada
Associate Prof. Dr. Komsiyah, University of Trisakti, Indonesia
Alexander Decker, DBA., International Institute for Science, Technology, and Education, USA

Editors Advisors:
Professor David Crowther, Ph.D., De Monfort University, UK
Professor Rob Gray, Ph.D., St. Andrews University, Scotland UK
Professor Ainun Naim, Ph.D., University of Gadjah Mada, Indonesia
Professor Achmad Syakrosa, Ph.D., University of Indonesia, Indonesia

Members of Board:

Professor Carol Adams, Ph.D., La Trobe University, Australia
Professor Amanda Ball, Ph.D., University of Canterbury, New Zealand
Professor Judy Brown, Ph.D., Victoria University of Willington, New Zealand
Professor Alistair Brown, Ph.D., University of Curtin, Australia
Professor Choi, Jong-Seo, Ph.D., Pusan National University, Korea
Professor Gabriel Donleavy, Ph.D., University of Macau, China
Professor James Guthrie, Ph.D., The University of Sydney, Australia
Professor Pamela Kent, Ph.D., Bond University, Australia
Professor Katsuhiko Kokubu, Ph.D., Kobe University, Japan
Professor Stewart Lawrence, Ph.D., University of Waikato, New Zealand
Professor Freeman, Edward, Ph.D., University of Virginia USA
Professor Carol Tilt, Ph.D., Flinders University of South Australia, Australia
Professor Keith Maunders, Ph.D., University of the South Pacific, Fiji
Professor O’Donovan, Garry, Ph.D., University of Tasmania, Australia
Professor Robin Roberts, Ph.D., University of Central Florida, USA
Professor Idris, Kamil M. Idris, Ph.D., Universiti Utara malaysia
Professor Abdul A. Rasheed, Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington
Professor Stefan Schaltegger, Ph.D., University of Lueneburg Germany
Professor Swagata Sen, Ph.D., University of Calcutta, India
Professor Tjiptohadi Sawarjuwono, Ph.D., University of Airlangga, Indonesia
Professor Pamela Stapleton, Ph.D., University of Manchester UK
Professor Goran Svensson, Ph.D., Oslo School of Management, Norway
Professor Lee Parker, Ph.D., University of South Australia
Professor GÜlar Aras, Ph.D., Yıldız Technical University, Turley
Professor Martin Freedman, Ph.D., Towson University, USA
Professor Den Paten, Ph.D., Illonois State University, USA
Professor Carlos Larrinaga-González, Burgos University, Spain
Professor Mustaffa M. Zein., Ph.D., UiTM, Malaysia
Professor Eko Ganis, Ph.D., University of Brawijaya, Indonesia
Professor Masudul Alam Choudhury, Ph.D., Sultan Qaboos University, Oman
Associate Prof. Kıymet Çalıyurt, Ph.D., Trakya University, Turkey
Associate Prof. Shawn Berman, Ph.D., New Mexico University, USA
Associate Prof. Hussain A. Al-Khadash, Ph.D., Hashemite University, Jordania
Associate Prof. Husted, Bryan, Ph.D., ITESM/Instituto de Empresa, Mexico
Associate Prof. David Campbell, Ph.D., New Castle University, UK
Associate Prof. Rémi Jardat., Ph.D., Ecole Superieure de Commerce et de Marketing, France
Associate Prof. Lois Mahoney, Ph.D., Eastern Michigan University , USA
Associate Prof. Marc Orlitzky , Pennsylvania State University, USA
Associate Prof. Charles H. Cho, Ph.D., Essec Business School, France
Associate Prof. Magness , Vanessa, Ph.D., Ryerson University, Toronto Canada
Associate Prof. Nik Ahmad, Nik Nazli, Ph.D., International Islamic University Malaysia, Malaysia
Associate Prof. Monica Tarta, Monica, Ph.D., The Academy of Economic Studies, Bucharest, Romania
Associate Prof. Petia Koleva, University of Nantes, France
Associate Prof. Selvam D., Ph.D., VIT University, India
Associate Prof. Djoko Suhardjanto, Ph.D., Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia
Associate Prof. Unti Ludigdo, Ph.D., University of Brawijaya, Indonesia
Associate Prof. Haslinda Yusoff, Ph.D., Universiti Teknologi Mara, Malaysia
Associate Prof. Azlan Amran, Ph.D., University Sains Malaysia
Associate Prof. Faizah Darus, Ph.D., Universiti Teknologi Mara, Malaysia
Christine Maria jasch, Ph.D., The Institute for Environmental Management and Economics, Austria
Evangeline Elijido-Ten, Ph.D., Swinburne University of Technology, Australia
Ataur Belal, Ph.D., Ashton University, UK
Jennifer C. Chen, Ph.D., Brigham Young University, Hawai, USA
Alan Murray, Ph.D., Sheffield University, UK
Deborah Savage, Ph.D., EMA Research & Information Center (EMARIC), USA
Georgios Georgakopoulos, Ph.D. University of Amsterdam, Netherland
Mahmood A. Momin, Ph.D., Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand.
Matias Laine, Ph.D. University of Tampere, Finland
Ralph Paliam, Ph.D., American University of Kuwait, Safat, Kuwait
Dewi Fitriani Kwari, Ph.D., Norotomo University, Surabaya, Indonesia
Roshima Said, Ph.D., UiTM Kedah, Malaysia
M. Azizul Islam, Ph.D., Deakin University, Australia
M. Agung Prabowo, Ph.D., Sebelas Maret University, Indonesia